H O M E
JAPANESE LONGTAILS:

ONAGADORI
SHOKOKU
OHIKI
MINOHIKI
TOTENKO
KUROKASHIWA
SATSUMADORI

CHINESE LONGTAILS

KOREAN LONGTAILS

EUROPEAN LONGTAILS
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
PHOENIX
YOKOHAMA
YOKOHAMA (UK)

SUMATRA - diverse

BREEDING LONGTAILS
NEW DEVELOPMENTS
BIRDS OF CASA ROCCA
WORLD WIDE CONTACTS

LONGCROWERS:
KOEYOSHI
TOTENKO
DENIZLI
TOMARU
BERGISCHE KRAEHER
YURLOWER
BERAT
KOSOVA / DRENICA

OTHER BREEDS:

CEMANI
SHAMO
KO-SHAMO
CHIBI
YAMATO GUNKEI
KINPA
NANKIN SHAMO
YAKIDO
Contact
 

The OHIKI 尾曳鶏

Little gnomes and jewels of the garden!

 

Ohiki Page One / Page Two



 
 
 
 
 
 

Here below are some of the birds from the flocks of Ohiki developed by Mrs. Toni-Marie Astin, USA, from eggs I exported to her from Switzerland. She had very few to work with in the first year and carefully outcrossed and line bred to achieve some amazing results.

 

Click on the smaller photos below to see them enlarged.

   
   
   

Photos below are from other sources as marked. Click on the smaller photos below to see them enlarged.




 
   


The Ohiki is destined for great popularity. It's small size, amicable temperament, wobbly gait and exotic, long-feathered beauty make it immediately endearing in the garden as well as on the show bench. A small flock of these lilliputian jewels bobbing on bright green lawn is a delight to behold.

 

Relatively easy to raise with a little extra care due to their diminutive size, the Ohiki do not have the lethal short-legged gene as is found in Chabo, one of its presumed ancestors, so the most important factor in breeding them is to select roosters with long-enough legs to be able to mount the hens and warm, completely dry raising pens for the chicks. Once fully feathered out, they are hardy.

 


I have scanned two sketches of mine to give a better impression of a Standard for the Ohiki. The body is low, the comb form single, the size of which varies according to the particular line or colour of the birds.

 

 

I have one line that is a Black Breasted Red (a dark Golden Duckwing) and that is very feather rich and has medium large combs. We recently acquire a second bloodline from Mr Wolfgang Vits of Germany which is longer in the back, but smaller in the comb. I have also displayed on this page two BBSilver lines - one we acquire thanks again to Mr. Wolfgang Vits, and another, which could be of the same lineage, of BBSilver Ohiki in Belgium (below).

 




What is very important in this breed is the Chabo or Cochin-like carriage, with the rump of these little birds being raised distinctly and well rounded. There are also different strains of Ohiki as far as feathering goes, some of which show more Onagadori blood with tail lengths up to three feet. Not all Japanese are agreed with this line of breeding. Please link on to Page four below of our own OHIKI to see examples.

 

Our strains have moderate lengths of 60 - 80 cm, which is much easier for these little gnomes to drag behind them, but the strain originally from Knut Roeder has had, on the average, longer feathers.

 

The saddle hackle must drag the ground. The leg colour is olive (willow), and this colour is reflected in the earlobes until the feathers are finished growing and go dry. As long as a bird (any) is in bloodfeathers, the earlobes reflect the colour of the legs and this is very noteable with the longtails as tehy need many more months to "finish" due to the extended growth period of the tail feathers.

 

The Ohiki has presented us with just a few problems in breeding, but is not, in general, as delicate as some of the other newer Japanese breeds here in Europe.

 

My experience is that unless the incubator is one of the more modern with computer-controlled humidity levels, etc., that the eggs are not dependable in the incubator (nicht Kunstbrustfest). Not all our hens go broody, and only tried older hens were the ones we could depend on.


When the chicks hatch, they are ususally on very wobbly little legs, so energetic chicks (like of gamefowl breeds, etc) should not be kept in the same brooder, as the little Ohiki chicks will be easily trampled. Once grown, they are very cold hardy, lively and yet very tame little "wobbly" garden gnomes!



Ohiki Page One / Page Two



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